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Update on Eli Mattson

Posted on 2008.11.04 at 00:28
Current Location: Wine Country, CA
Current Mood: excitedexcited
Current Music: Walking in Memphis by Eli Mattson
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OK, so here's the latest and greatest news:

Eli just landed a major recording contract!
http://www.suntimes.com/entertainment/zwecker/1256506,CST-FTR-zp03.article

Of course, anyone who's heard him sing or play the piano couldn't believe it took this long for him to get signed. He's unbelievably talented, extremely hard working, humble, and a really nice guy.

Congratulations, Eli! I'll be first in line to get all of your new releases!

Debbie

PS If you'd like to see Eli singing Walking in Memphis, just go here

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Snowy Night Gansey Stocking

Posted on 2008.09.17 at 11:48
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
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Well, another first for me!  This is my first Christmas stocking and Gansey design I've ever done!  Unfortunately, no matter how many pictures I take and edit, the detail just doesn't show up here!  It's amazing in person.
 

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Max's Staircase Tam

Posted on 2008.09.17 at 11:44
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
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This was my first hat, and I just love the tam's!  There are so many different patterns, and other ways to play with them!  

Max's Staircase Tam was a really easy and fun knit.  And, I have a special someone in mind who just might like this!

 

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New VERY FAVORITE Song ...

Posted on 2008.06.24 at 17:35
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
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Yeah, even though this is not a new song, I just heard it for the very first time ... and LOVE IT! Thought I'd share it with you.

Debbie


Every Rose Has Its Thorn by Poison

We both lie silently still in the dead of the night
Although we both lie close together
We feel miles apart inside
Was it somethin' I said or somethin' I did
Did my words not come out right
Tho' I tried not to hurt you
Tho' I tried
But I guess that's why they say

Every rose has its thorn
Just like every night has its dawn
Just like every cowboy sings a sad, sad song
Every rose has its thorn

Yeah it does

I listen to your favorite song playin' on the radio
Hear the DJ say love's a game of
Easy come and easy go
But I wonder does he know
Has it ever felt like this
And I know that you'd be here right now
If I could have let you know somehow I guess

Every rose has its thorn
Just like every night has its dawn
Just like every cowboy sings a sad, sad song
Every rose has its thorn

Though it's been a while now
I can still feel so much pain
Like the knife that cuts you
The wound heals, but the scar, that scar remains

I know I could have saved our love that night
If I'd known what to say
Instead if making love
We both made our separate ways

Now I hear you've found somebody new
And that I never meant that much to you
To hear that tears me up inside
And to see you cuts me like a knife, I guess

Every rose has its thorn
Just like every night has its dawn
Just like every cowboy sings a sad, sad song
Every rose has its thorn


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Irelandn Trip

Posted on 2008.05.15 at 15:27
Current Mood: excitedexcited
I'm leaving bright and early tomorrow morning for Ireland. I'll post lots of pics and details when I return on the 27th.

Want to see the weather there? Here it is!





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What type of person do you attract?

Posted on 2008.01.11 at 03:20
What type of person do you attract?
Your Result: You attract geeks!
 

Your stunning intellect and love of sci-fi and video games allures the geeks like nothing else. Maybe it is the sparkle in your eye that makes them want to text you, who knows. Geeks make good partners, but tend to be arguementative. If you are a TRUE geek magnet, you will know if that was spelled correctly, and actually care. If it is a bad-boy/bad-girl you are seeking, you are barking up the wrong tree, unless they are just 'bad' behind a PS2 console.

You attract Yuppies!
 
You attract artsy people!
 
You attract rednecks!
 
You attract models!
 
You attract unstable people!
 

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What animal am I?

Posted on 2008.01.11 at 03:12
ANIMOLOGY: What Animal Are You?
Your Result: Tan Giraffe
 

Loner. You're a sort of a loner, but you are very brave and a quick thinker. You have a little secret: you like to help others. Soul Mate is the Red Jaguar, but you hate the Marroon Panda.

Teal Cat
 
Silver and Red Wolf
 
Ocre and Gray Dolphin
 
Gold Falcon
 
Blue Fox
 
Red Jaguar
 
Yellow Trout
 

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What color hair should I have?

Posted on 2008.01.11 at 03:11
Your Hair Should Be Orange

Expressive, deep, and one of a kind.
You pull off "weird" well - hardly anyone notices.
What's Your Funky Inner Hair Color?

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What kind of soul am I

Posted on 2008.01.11 at 03:08
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You Are a Dreaming Soul

Your vivid emotions and imagination takes you away from this world
So much so that you tend to live in your head most of the time
You have great dreams and ambitions that could be the envy of all...
But for you, following through with your dreams is a bit difficult

You are charming, endearing, and people tend to love you.
Forgiving and tolerant, you see the world through rose colored glasses.
Underneath it all, you have a ton of passion that you hide from others.
Always hopeful, you tend to expect positive outcomes in your life.

Souls you are most compatible with: Newborn Soul, Prophet Soul, and Traveler Soul
What Kind of Soul Are You?

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My Blue Socks...Finally Started

Posted on 2007.11.03 at 17:57
Current Location: Santa Rosa CA
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
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 Finally Started My Blue Socks ~


I've been waiting until I mastered sock-knitting to break out this yarn (Regia Jacquard - 75/25).  Now that I've almost finished a perfect pair of socks, it's time to start on the bin full of sock yarn!  I'm making this pair of socks for me, as it should knit up fairly quickly (even on size 1 or 2's), and then will start on the gift socks. 
 


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Spun Yarn ... What to Make?

Posted on 2007.11.03 at 12:40
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: blankblank
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Spun Yarn ~ What to Make???



Well, lately I've spent WAY more time spinning than knitting, and I've enjoyed every minute of it!  I've now amassed so much hand-spun yarn, that I'm starting to wonder what I'm going to make with it all!  I don't have a niddy-noddy or yarn meter so I really don't know how many yards of each yarn I have.  My guess is 200 yards or more of each of most of them, and 100 yards of most of the rest of the spun yarn.  And they're all different colors, although I do have more of some colors than others. 

Most of what I've spun is Merino Wool, although there's a little bit of Corriedale Wool there too, and one hank with silk.  Can you mix them in a knitting project?  How about a knit and felted project? 

And, I've become much better at spinning since I first started, and the more recent yarn is much more even than the first ones I spun.

Hmmm...  Any ideas?

Debbie

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My latest hand-spun yarn.

Posted on 2007.11.03 at 12:16
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: accomplishedaccomplished
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My latest hand-spun yarn


This is my latest hand-spun yarn - merino wool.  The picture isn't showing the color right.  It's pink and very pale yellow. 

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Spinning again...

Posted on 2007.10.31 at 13:53
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: busybusy
Tags:
Spinning Again...
Here are my latest spinning efforts.  I really can't believe how relaxing it is.



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Happy Halloween!

Posted on 2007.10.31 at 11:48
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: tiredtired
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Happy Halloween!

Edlayna insisted Phil had to dress up for halloween - and not just a costume - she insisted on make-up since it's a party store.  Can she do that? Hmmm....Phil wasn't happy!  He wanted to be Bob the Builder again.  Very simple ... construction hat and tool belt. 

Well, here are the results of his clown face, with crappy dollar store make-up. 


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Bento Box Supplies

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 14:48
Current Location: Home
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Bento Box Supplies

I'm totally hooked on bento lunches!  Although I don't have a bento box yet, I do have these things:





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Spinning

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 14:42
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: accomplishedaccomplished
Tags:
Spinning

I've been spinning more lately, and having so much fun!  I think I'm finally getting the hang of it, because I'm having less of the thick/thin (except when I'm trying to get thick/thin), and less breaks while spinning and plying.  Here's the latest:











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Our Trip: Hiking in the Redwoods

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 14:19
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: amusedamused
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Our Trip:  Hiking in the Redwoods

We went for a loooong day trip to Ferndale, Eureka, and the redwoods.  Came home exhausted, but had a blast! 

Here's part of our fun trip!

On our way home from Eureka, we stopped  at one of the redwood parks we came to, and hiked for a little bit.  Too cool!  I so love the redwoods!  Warning, lots of pictures below!






 





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Our Trip: Somoa Cookhouse

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 13:56
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: amusedamused
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Our Trip:  Somoa Cookhouse

We went for a loooong day trip to Ferndale, Eureka, and the redwoods.  Came home exhausted, but had a blast! 

Here's part of our fun trip!

We had a late lunch at the Somoa Cookhouse before heading back home.  Way cool!  If you haven't been there, it's a must-see!
Everyone sits at long tables, and the cook fixes whatever he wants, and that's what everyone eats.  It's served family-style, and there's more food than you can eat.  Everything's included, soup, salad, meal, dessert, drinks.  We'll definitely go back there again!








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Our Trip: Eureka

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 13:50
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: amusedamused
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Our Trip:  Eureka

We went for a loooong day trip to Ferndale, Eureka, and the redwoods.  Came home exhausted, but had a blast! 

Here's part of our fun trip!

These are pictures of places we went and things we saw in Eureka.  I actually liked Eureka enough to want to live there.  We're hoping to make another trip, with Heather this time, and see more of Eureka.  Trinidad will be in that next trip too.





Yes, we went to Eureka because I wanted to see the Boll Weaver knitting store.  I even checked their website, which said they'd be open.  They weren't.  Too bad.  We still had a great trip without them. 

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Our Trip: Loleta Cheese Factory

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 13:33
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: amusedamused
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Our Trip:  Loleta Cheese Factory

We went for a loooong day trip to Ferndale, Eureka, and the redwoods.  Came home exhausted, but had a blast! 

Here's part of our fun trip! 

This was actually one of my very favorite parts of the trip!  The Loleta Cheese Factory was way more than just cheese...although the cheese was outstanding!  Lots of pictures here, including one  of the most friendly person I met on our trip!




This is her!  The nicest, most friendly person ever!  She's so sweet!  Worth the trip just to meet her! 

Ok, so I didn't take hardly any pictures inside the cheese factory.  But I took TONS of pictures in their gardens!








Yeah, this is my favorite one!



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Our Trip: Ferndale

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 13:10
Current Location: home
Current Mood: amusedamused
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Our Trip:  Ferndale

We went for a loooong day trip to Ferndale, Eureka, and the redwoods.  Came home exhausted, but had a blast! 

Here's part of our fun trip!

We stopped by Ferndale to look around, and had lunch at a little cafe.  Cheeseburger and fries for Phil, and grilled cheese for me.  Yum! 

These are some various photos I took in Ferndale. 










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Our Trip: The Legend of Bigfoot

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 12:52
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
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Our Trip:  The Legend of Bigfoot

We went for a loooong day trip to Ferndale, Eureka, and the redwoods.  Came home exhausted, but had a blast! 

Here's part of our fun trip!

 
We saw this from the highway, and had to stop.  It's hard to believe all of these were carved with chainsaws!

 











 




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Our Trip: Drive Through Tree

Posted on 2007.10.27 at 12:30
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: happyhappy
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Our Trip:  Drive Through Tree

We went for a loooong day trip to Ferndale, Eureka, and the redwoods.  Came home exhausted, but had a blast! 

Here's part of our fun trip!


Driving up 101 early morning...


We stopped off it Willits to go see the drive-through tree. 


The Chandelier Tree is one of only three drive-through redwood trees remaining.  All three of them all privately-owned. 

   
It's hard to imagine how large this tree really is unless you see it in real life. 

  
Driving through the tree.  The second picture is a look outside the passenger seat side window.



A look inside the drive-through tree.



Hard to read but here's the sign explaining about the tree.

  
My looks up the tree.


The sign on the tree.  Can you imagine it's 2400 years old???

 
An old logging cart still on the property..............................................and a view of the redwood still on the cart.

 
Close-up views of the logging cart.

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Apricot Daisy Ring

Posted on 2007.10.26 at 15:59
Current Mood: awakeawake
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Apricot Daisy Ring

This is the elusive cookbook which has the recipe for the Apricot Daisy Ring.  It's also one of the easiest ways to learn to cook!  Lots of pictures, and everything explained as if you've never cooked before. 

Better Homes & Gardens Complete Step-by-Step Cookbook

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Another one about me!

Posted on 2007.10.24 at 14:25
Current Mood: accomplishedaccomplished
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Tagged: About Me

I found this on knittnlissa's blog (http://knittnlissa.typepad.com/knittnlissa/), and she's tagged everyone, so here's my answers:

Bold the ones you've done..

01. Bought everyone in the bar a drink
02. Swam with wild dolphins
03. Climbed a mountain
04. Taken a Ferrari for a test drive (hmm...not a ferrari, but a corvette and an austin healey)
05. Been inside the Great Pyramid
06. Held a tarantula
07. Taken a candlelit bath with someone
08. Said 'I love you' and meant it
09. Hugged a tree
10. Bungee jumped
11. Visited Paris
12. Watched a lightening storm at sea
13. Stayed up all night long and saw the sun rise
14. Seen the Northern Lights
15. Gone to a huge sports game
16. Walked the stairs to the top of the leaning Tower of Pisa
17. Grown and eaten your own vegetables
18. Touched an iceberg
19. Slept under the stars
20. Changed a baby's diaper
21. Taken a trip in a hot air balloon
22. Watched a meteor shower
23. Gotten drunk on champagne
24. Given more than you can afford to charity
25. Looked up at the night sky through a telescope
26. Had an uncontrollable giggling fit at the worst possible moment
27. Had a food fight
28. Bet on a winning horse

29. Asked out a stranger
30. Had a snowball fight
31. Screamed as loudly as you possibly could
32. Held a lamb
33. Seen a total eclipse
34. Ridden a roller coaster
35. Hit a home run
36. Danced like a fool and not cared who was looking

37. Adopted an accent for an entire day
38. Actually felt happy about your life, even for just a moment
39. Had two hard drives for your computer
40. Visited all 50 states
41. Taken care of someone who was shitfaced
42. Had amazing friends
43. Danced with a stranger in a foreign country
44. Watched wild whales
45. Stolen a sign
46. Backpacked in Europe
47. Taken a road-trip
48. Gone rock climbing
49. Midnight walk on the beach
50. Gone sky diving
51. Visited Ireland
52. Been heartbroken longer then you were actually in love
53. In a restaurant, sat at a stranger's table and had a meal with them
54. Visited Japan
55. Milked a cow
56. Alphabetized your cds
57. Pretended to be a superhero
58. Sung karaoke
59. Lounged around in bed all day
60. Posed nude in front of strangers
61. Gone scuba diving
62. Kissed in the rain
63. Played in the mud
64. Played in the rain

65. Gone to a drive-in theater
66. Visited the Great Wall of China
67. Started a business
68. Fallen in love and not had your heart broken
69. Toured ancient sites
70 Taken a martial arts class
71. Played D&D for more than 6 hours straight
72. Gotten married
73. Been in a movie
74. Crashed a party
75. Gotten divorced
76. Gone without food for 5 days
77. Made cookies from scratch
78. Won first prize in a costume contest
79. Ridden a gondola in Venice
80. Gotten a tattoo
81. Gone white water rafting
82. Been on television news programs as an "expert" (no, but I was quoted in a book as an expert.  Asked to go on tv as an expert, too)
83. Got flowers for no reason
84. Performed on stage
85. Been to Las Vegas

86. Recorded music
87. Eaten shark
88. Had a one-night stand (hmm...don't read this one, heather)

89. Gone to Thailand
90. Bought a house
91. Been in a combat zone
92. Buried one/both of your parents
93. Been on a cruise ship
94. Spoken more than one language fluently
95. Performed in Rocky Horror.
96. Raised children
97. Followed your favorite band/singer on tour
98. Created and named your own constellation of stars
99. Taken an exotic bicycle tour in a foreign country
100. Picked up and moved to another city to just start over
101. Walked the Golden Gate Bridge
102. Sang loudly in the car, and didn't stop when you knew someone was looking
103. Had plastic surgery
104. Survived an accident that you shouldn't have survived.
105. Wrote articles for a large publication
106. Lost over 100 pounds
107. Held someone while they were having a flashback
108. Piloted an airplane
109. Petted a stingray
110. Broken someone's heart
111. Helped an animal give birth
112. Won money on a T.V. game show
113. Broken a bone
114. Gone on an African photo safari
115. Had a body part of yours below the neck pierced
116. Fired a rifle, shotgun or pistol
117. Eaten mushrooms that were gathered in the wild
118. Ridden a horse
119. Had major surgery
120. Had a snake as a pet
121. Hiked to the bottom of the Grand Canyon
122. Slept for more than 30 hours over the course of 48 hours
123. Visited more foreign countries than U.S. states
124. Visited all 7 continents
125. Taken a canoe trip that lasted more than 2 days
126. Eaten kangaroo meat
127. Eaten sushi
128. Had your picture in the newspaper
129. Changed someone's mind about something you care deeply about
130. Gone back to school
131. Parasailed
132. Petted a cockroach
133. Eaten fried green tomatoes
134. Read the Iliad and the Odyssey
135. Selected one "important" author who you missed in school, and read
136. Killed and prepared an animal for eating
137. Skipped all of your school reunions
138. Communicated with someone without sharing a common spoken language
139. Been elected to public office
140. Written your own computer language
141. Thought to yourself that you're living your dream
142. Had to put someone you love into hospice care
143. Built your own PC from parts
145. Sold your own artword to someone who didn't know you
145. Had a booth at a street fair
146: Dyed your hair
147: Been a DJ
148: Shaved your head
149: Caused a car accident
150: Saved someone's life

Tag: Anyone who reads this!


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Easy Funnel Cake

Posted on 2007.10.16 at 12:05
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Found a recipe for a very easy funnel cake! Hmmm...maybe this weekend! The recipe is from the Alton Brown show on Food Network called Good Eats. Yum!

Funnel Cake - Easy
10 Minutes Prep
10 Minutes Cooking
Yields 10 Funnel Cakes

INGREDIENTS
1 c Water
6 T Butter
1 T Sugar
1/8 t Salt
1 c Flour
1 c Eggs
Oil for frying
Powdered Sugar
Fruit for topping (optional)
Whipped Cream for topping (optional)

DIRECTIONS

Boil water, butter, sugar and salt in a saucepan. Add flour all at once, and work until it's incorporated, and forms a ball.

Transfer dough ball to a mixer bowl, and let rest for 4-5 minutes, to start to cool.

With mixer at a low speed, add eggs, one at a time, making sure each egg is fully incorporated before adding another.

Once all eggs have been added and dough is smooth, fit a piping bag with a number 12 tip, and add dough mixture to the piping bag.

Heat about 1-1/2 inches of oil in a heavy frying pan. Pipe dough in slow circular lattice design into oil. Cook until browned, flip and repeat. Drain on paper towels, and repeat.

Top funnel cake with powdered sugar. You can also add fresh fruit and whipped cream on top for an extra sinful dessert!

*Recipe directions have been slightly reworded for clarity, and I've added the fruit and whipped cream.

Enjoy!

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Rice Vinegar vs Rice Wine Vinegar

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:51
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Is There a Difference Between Rice Vinegar and Rice Wine Vinegar?
 
No, the two are identical. According to Lawrence Driggs of the International Vinegar Museum in Roslyn, S.D., the confusion arises from the fact that rice vinegar is essentially an acidic companion to Japanese sake. Sake is a rice beverage that stands on its own in the world of alcohol: it is not a spirit, though it is sipped from small glasses and has a strong, sweet taste, and it is not wine, though it is known colloquially as “rice wine.” Flavor and carbonation aside, sake is most like beer -- both are brewed from fermented grains. Chinese rice wines are similar to sake, but most have added salt and are not taken by the glass -- they are only used in cooking.

According to Linda J. Harris, professor of food microbiology at the University of California at Davis, rice vinegar is made in a three-step process. Steamed, glutinous, white rice is broken down into sugars, blended with yeast to ferment into alcohol, and, finally, aerated to form vinegar. We conducted a tasting of three brands of rice vinegar -- the popular Japanese Marukan, another supermarket Japanese brand called Nakano, and the hard-to-find Chinese Foshan-Haitian -- and all of our tasters preferred the Japanese brands to the Chinese Foshan brand. They commented on the overall clarity and the light, sweet taste of the Japanese varieties, but the extramild Marukan received a few more nods than the slightly tangy Nakano. The Chinese rice vinegar was not well received. Tasters were put off by its cloudiness and overly astringent taste. Driggs explained that the Japanese have a more highly developed production process and tighter quality control than the Chinese, so Chinese rice vinegars are usually of lesser quality.

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Bottled Teriyanki Sauces

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:46
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Bottled Teriyaki Sauces

How do they taste? We sampled seven leading brands to find out.

Considering that a great teriyaki sauce can be had in a mere five minutes with six not terribly exotic ingredients, bottled sauces can hardly boast convenience. But how do they taste? We sampled seven leading brands to find out.

Our 19 tasters had difficulty identifying many of these sauces as teriyaki. Several brands resembled hoisin, oyster, or even barbecue sauce. Of the three that met tasters' standards for teriyaki sauce, Annie Chun's All Natural received top marks. A second tasting pitted Annie Chun's against our homemade teriyaki sauce. Our judges deemed Annie Chun's harsh in comparison to the brighter-tasting and better-balanced sauce we had made ourselves. -Garth Clingingsmith

DECENT
ANNIE CHUN'S All Natural Teriyaki Sauce
"Smooth, rich texture" and indisputable teriyaki flavor, but cannot compare to homemade.

TOLERABLE
SOY VAY Veri Veri Teriyaki
No one objected to the "whoa, garlic" flavor, but offensive "little floaties" of sesame and onion turned many away.

SUN LUCK Honey Mirin Teriyaki Sauce
Overwhelming sweetness tended to overshadow the "fishy" and "chemical" flavors. Surprisingly, a few tasters asked, "Where's the salt?"

NOT RECOMMENDED
HOUSE OF TSANG Tokyo Teriyaki Hibachi
Grill Sauce "Gluelike texture" and "molasses-like" sweetness reminded tasters of oyster sauce.

KIKKOMAN Lite Teriyaki Marinade & Sauce
This watery sauce was dominated by "loads of ginger" and "vinegary acidity."

KIKKOMAN Teriyaki Marinade & Sauce
"This is straight soy," summed up tasters' responses to this thin and salty sauce.

SAN-J Traditional Japanese Teriyaki
Stir-Fry & Marinade "Peppery, scorched harshness" made this "Japanese A-1" tough to swallow.

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Breaded Chicken Cutlets with Garlic & Oregano

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:45
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Breaded Chicken Cutlets with Garlic and Oregano
9/2001

If you’d rather not prepare fresh bread crumbs, use panko, or Japanese, bread crumbs, which cook up extracrisp. The chicken is cooked in batches of two because the crust is noticeably more crisp if the pan is not overcrowded. Finally, because the tenderloins--the small strips of meat on the underside of the breast--are likely to become detached during cooking, they must be removed at the outset. These cutlets can be served on their own, with lemon wedges, or used in sandwiches.

Serves 4
4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (5 to 6 ounces each), preferably a premium brand, tenderloins removed and reserved for another use
1/2 cup kosher salt or 1/4 cup table salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar 
5 - 8 slices high-quality white bread such as Pepperidge Farm, crusts removed and torn into rough 1 1/2-inch pieces
  Ground black pepper 
3/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 
2 large eggs 
3 tablespoons minced fresh oregano leaves  
8 medium cloves garlic , pressed through garlic press, grated, or minced to puree
1 tablespoon vegetable oil 
3/4 cup vegetable oil 
  lemon wedges for serving


1. Pound chicken breasts to even 1/2-inch thickness. Dissolve salt and sugar in 1 quart cold water in gallon-size zipper-lock plastic bag. Add cutlets and seal bag, pressing out as much air as possible; refrigerate 30 minutes. Line rimmed baking sheet with triple layer of paper towels.

2. Remove cutlets and lay in single layer on baking sheet; cover with another triple layer of paper towels and press firmly to absorb moisture. Allow cutlets to dry for 10 minutes. Process bread in food processor until evenly fine-textured, 20 to 30 seconds (you should have about 1 1/2 cups fresh bread crumbs). Transfer crumbs to baking dish. Carefully peel paper towels off cutlets, sprinkle cutlets with pepper, and set aside.

3. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position, set large heatproof plate on rack, and heat oven to 200 degrees. Spread flour in baking dish. Beat eggs, oregano, and garlic with 1 tablespoon oil in second baking dish. Spread bread crumbs in third baking dish.

4. As shown in illustrations below, bread the cutlets, one at a time. Dredge cutlet in flour, shaking off excess. Using tongs, dip both sides of cutlet in egg mixture, allowing excess to drip back into baking dish to ensure very thin coating. Dip both sides of cutlet in bread crumbs, pressing crumbs with fingers to form even, cohesive coat. Place breaded cutlets in single layer on wire rack set over baking sheet and allow coating to dry for about 5 minutes.

5. Meanwhile, heat 6 tablespoons remaining oil in heavy-bottomed 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking, about 2 minutes. Lay two cutlets gently in skillet; cook until deep golden brown and crisp on first side, gently pressing down on cutlets with wide metal spatula to help ensure even browning, about 2 1/2 minutes. Using tongs, flip cutlets, reduce heat to medium, and continue to cook until meat feels firm when pressed gently and second side is deep golden brown and crisp, 2 1/2 to 3 minutes longer. Line warmed plate with double layer of paper towels and set cutlets on top; return plate to oven.

6. Discard oil in skillet and wipe skillet clean using tongs and large wad of paper towels. Repeat step 5 using remaining 6 tablespoons oil and now-clean skillet to cook remaining cutlets; serve along with first batch with lemon wedges.




STEP BY STEP: Breading the Cutlets

1. Coat the dry chicken breast - liberally and evenly with flour before spanking the excess off, leaving only the barest film.

2. Using tongs, dip the floured breast in the egg wash, taking care to coat the entire surface before letting the excess drip back into the pan.

3. Good crumb depth is essential for an even, dry coating. Toss the chicken in the crumbs to coat and then press with fingers for even distribution.

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Different Types of Rice

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:44
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Do Different Lengths of Rice (Long-, Medium-, or Short-Grain) Correlate to the Stickiness of the Rice?

 
There is in fact a correlation between length of grain and stickiness in rice. Generally speaking, the shorter the grain the stickier the rice.

The grain of any variety of rice is determined by the ratio of its length to its width. In long-grain rice, the grains are more than three times as long as they are wide. Well-known varieties include basmati, jasmine, and the American Carolina Gold. Both medium- and short-grain rice are often marketed and sold as short-grain to set them apart from long-grain—both have a fatter, more rounded look. Medium grains are 2 1⁄2 to three times longer than they are wide, and short grains are less than twice as long as they are wide. Most varieties of Japanese rice are medium- to short-grain, as are Italian Arborio (used for risotto) and Spanish Valencia (used for paella).

The stickiness of rice, referred to as waxiness in the rice industry, is related to its relative amount of amylose, a starch that does not gelatinize during cooking. The less amylose, the stickier the rice. Short-grain rice consists of 15 to 20 percent amylose, making it the most waxy and sticky of all rice types. Medium-grain rice has an average amylose content of 18 to 26 percent, putting it right in the middle of the waxiness spectrum. Finally, long-grain rice consists of 23 to 26 percent amylose, causing it to cook up light and fluffy.


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What is Umami

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:43
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What is Umami?
 
Umami describes a “meaty” or “brothy” flavor that the Japanese and other Asians have long considered a fifth basic taste along with the traditional Big Four of sweet, sour, salty, and bitter. Western scientists have also begun to accept the legitimacy of umami. According to Dr. Gary Beauchamp, director of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, “There is a growing consensus that umami is in fact distinct, that there is something different about it from all other tastes.”

The “umami” taste is produced by a common amino acid known as glutamate. Glutamate is present in relatively high amounts in all protein, including meat and dairy products, and also in certain vegetables. In mushrooms, the glutamate content is high enough to lend that familiar meaty flavor. Umami also works to make food more palatable in general. “Umami stimulates appetites in all cultures across the board,” says Steve Roper of the University of Miami. “Indeed, it seems very likely that glutamate drives the appetite for protein, just as the sweet taste drives the appetite for carbohydrates and the salt taste for minerals.”

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Fake Panko Flakes

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:43
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Pretend Panko Bread Crumbs
Printer Friendly

 
Coarser, flakier, and fluffier than standard bread crumbs, Japanese bread crumbs, called panko, give fried foods an unparalleled crispness. They are available in Asian markets and in the international section of well-stocked supermarkets, but in the event that you cannot find them, there is a way to make a close approximation from firm, good-quality sandwich bread. Here's what to do.

Fit a food processor with a medium or coarse shredding disk. Trim the crusts off the bread slices (5 slices will make about 1 cup of crumbs) and cut the slices in half. Drop a stack of three or four pieces (or as many as will fit comfortably) into the feed tube. Put the feed tube plunger in place and turn on the machine, allowing the weight of the plunger to push the bread through the shredding disk (do not apply additional pressure by pushing down on the plunger). Spread the crumbs in a thin, even layer on one or two rimmed baking sheets and let them dry at room temperature overnight.

If you can't wait that long, you can bake the crumbs in a 300-degree oven until dry to the touch, about 8 minutes; stir intermittently, but do not allow them to brown. The crumbs tend to clump in the oven; when the crumbs are cool, break up the clumps by rubbing them gently between your fingers. Once dried, the homemade panko can be stored in an airtight container or zipper-lock bag for two to three weeks at room temperature or for several months in the freezer.

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Deviled Breaded Chicken Cutlets

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:41
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Deviled Breaded Chicken Cutlets
9/2001

If you’d rather not prepare fresh bread crumbs, use panko, or Japanese, bread crumbs, which cook up extracrisp. The chicken is cooked in batches of two because the crust is noticeably more crisp if the pan is not overcrowded. Finally, because the tenderloins--the small strips of meat on the underside of the breast--are likely to become detached during cooking, they must be removed at the outset. These cutlets can be served on their own, with lemon wedges, or used in sandwiches.

Serves 4
4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (5 to 6 ounces each), preferably a premium brand, tenderloins removed and reserved for another use
1/2 cup kosher salt or 1/4 cup table salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar 
5 - 8 slices high-quality white bread such as Pepperidge Farm, crusts removed and torn into rough 1 1/2-inch pieces
  Ground black pepper 
  cayenne pepper 
3/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 
2 large eggs 
3 tablespoons Dijon mustard 
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 
2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme leaves  
1 tablespoon vegetable oil 
3/4 cup vegetable oil 
  lemon wedges for serving


1. Pound chicken breasts to even 1/2-inch thickness. Dissolve salt and sugar in 1 quart cold water in gallon-size zipper-lock plastic bag. Add cutlets and seal bag, pressing out as much air as possible; refrigerate 30 minutes. Line rimmed baking sheet with triple layer of paper towels.

2. Remove cutlets and lay in single layer on baking sheet; cover with another triple layer of paper towels and press firmly to absorb moisture. Allow cutlets to dry for 10 minutes. Process bread in food processor until evenly fine-textured, 20 to 30 seconds (you should have about 1 1/2 cups fresh bread crumbs). Transfer crumbs to baking dish. Carefully peel paper towels off cutlets, sprinkle cutlets with pepper, and set aside.

3. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position, set large heatproof plate on rack, and heat oven to 200 degrees. Spread flour in baking dish. Beat eggs, Dijon mustard, Worcestershire sauce, and minced thyme with 1 tablespoon oil in second baking dish. Spread bread crumbs in third baking dish.

4. Following illustrations below, bread the cutlets, one at a time. Rub each side of each cutlet with a generous pinch of cayenne pepper and then dredge cutlet in flour, shaking off excess. Using tongs, dip both sides of cutlet in egg mixture, allowing excess to drip back into baking dish to ensure very thin coating. Dip both sides of cutlet in bread crumbs, pressing crumbs with fingers to form even, cohesive coat. Place breaded cutlets in single layer on wire rack set over baking sheet and allow coating to dry for about 5 minutes.

5. Meanwhile, heat 6 tablespoons remaining oil in heavy-bottomed 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking, about 2 minutes. Lay two cutlets gently in skillet; cook until deep golden brown and crisp on first side, gently pressing down on cutlets with wide metal spatula to help ensure even browning, about 2 1/2 minutes. Using tongs, flip cutlets, reduce heat to medium, and continue to cook until meat feels firm when pressed gently and second side is deep golden brown and crisp, 2 1/2 to 3 minutes longer. Line warmed plate with double layer of paper towels and set cutlets on top; return plate to oven.

6. Discard oil in skillet and wipe skillet clean using tongs and large wad of paper towels. Repeat step 5 using remaining 6 tablespoons oil and now-clean skillet to cook remaining cutlets; serve along with first batch with lemon wedges.




STEP BY STEP: Breading the Cutlets

1. Coat the dry chicken breast - liberally and evenly with flour before spanking the excess off, leaving only the barest film.

2. Using tongs, dip the floured breast in the egg wash, taking care to coat the entire surface before letting the excess drip back into the pan.

3. Good crumb depth is essential for an even, dry coating. Toss the chicken in the crumbs to coat and then press with fingers for even distribution.

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Crisp Breaded Pork Cutlets

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:40
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Crisp Breaded Pork Cutlets
1/2002

Pork tenderloins, which are sometimes sold in pairs, can weigh anywhere from 12 to 24 ounces. For this recipe, it is best to use a tenderloin that weighs at least 16 ounces. If you have two skillets, you can use both at once to cut the time it takes to fry. Our favorite accompaniments for breaded pork cutlets are applesauce, mashed potatoes, or coleslaw.

Serves 3
6 slices white sandwich bread  (such as Pepperidge Farm), crusts removed and torn into rough 1 1/2-inch pieces
1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 
2 large eggs 
1 tablespoon vegetable oil 
1 cup vegetable oil 
1 pork tenderloin (about 1 pound), trimmed of silver skin, cut crosswise into 6 pieces, and pounded to thickness of 1/2 inch, following illustrations below
  Table salt and ground black pepper 


1. Process bread in food processor until evenly fine-textured, 10 to 15 seconds (you should have about 3 cups fresh bread crumbs); transfer crumbs to pie plate or shallow baking dish.

2. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position, set large heatproof plate on rack, and heat oven to 200 degrees. Spread flour in second pie plate. Beat eggs with 1 tablespoon oil in third pie plate. Position flour, egg, and bread crumb plates in row on work surface.

3. Blot cutlets dry with paper towels and sprinkle thoroughly with salt and pepper. Working one at a time, dredge cutlets thoroughly in flour, shaking off excess. Using tongs, dip both sides of cutlets in egg mixture, allowing excess to drip back into pie plate to ensure very thin coating. Dip both sides of cutlets in breadcrumbs, pressing crumbs with fingers to form even, cohesive coat. Place breaded cutlets in single layer on wire rack set over baking sheet and allow coating to dry about 5 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, heat 1/2 cup oil in heavy-bottomed 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking, about 2 1/2 minutes. Lay 3 cutlets in skillet; fry until deep golden brown and crisp on first side, gently pressing down on cutlets with wide metal spatula to help ensure even browning and checking browning partway through, about 2 1/2 minutes (smaller cutlets from tail end of tenderloin may cook faster). Using tongs, flip cutlets, reduce heat to medium, and continue to cook until meat feels firm when pressed gently and second side is deep golden brown and crisp, again checking browning partway through, about 2 1/2 minutes longer. Line warmed plate with double layer of paper towels and set cutlets on top; return plate to oven.

5. Discard oil in skillet and wipe skillet clean using tongs and large wad paper towels. Repeat step 4 using remaining 1/2 cup oil and now-clean skillet and preheating oil just 2 minutes to cook remaining 3 cutlets.




STEP BY STEP: Turning One Tenderloin into Six (or Four) Cutlets

1. Slip knife under silver skin, angle it slightly upward, and use gentle sawing motion to remove silver skin.

2. Cut tenderloin crosswise into six equal pieces (or four pieces for smaller 12 ounce tenderloin), including tapered tail end.

3. Place one piece of tenderloin on cut side on piece of plastic or parchment, cover with second piece, and pound gently to even thickness of 1/2 inch.

4. To produce cutlet from thin tailpiece, fold tip of tail under cut side and pound between two sheets of plastic or parchment.

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Best Panko Flakes

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:38
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Panko Decoded

from Cook's Illustrated

In our taste tests, we couldn't distinguish among brands for flavor, but there was a difference in texture.

To see if there really is a difference between the brands of this light, Japanese-style bread-crumb coating, we picked up four samples—Wel-Pac, Dynasty, Kikkoman, and Ian's—at Boston-area supermarkets and tested them in two recipes: baked chicken Parmesan and pan-fried breaded pork cutlets. Each brand worked fine in both baked and fried applications, but with slightly different textural qualities. While the Wel-Pac, Dynasty, and Kikkoman brands possessed a delicate crispness, the oil-free Ian's (purchased from a large natural foods supermarket) provided a much more substantial crunch. In the end, if a super-crunchy—rather than delicate and crisp—texture is what you're aiming for, choose Ian's. Otherwise, brand doesn't really matter.


Our tasters discovered that one brand of panko is crunchier than the rest.


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Ultimate Veggie Burgers

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:37
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Ultimate Veggie Burgers
7/2005

Canned lentils can be used, though some flavor will be sacrificed. Use a 15-ounce can, drain the lentils in a mesh strainer, and thoroughly rinse under cold running water before spreading them on paper towels and drying them, as directed in step 1 below. If you cannot find panko, use 1 cup of plain bread crumbs. For tips on freezing uncooked patties, see below.

Makes twelve 4-inch burgers
3/4 cup dried brown lentils , rinsed and picked over
2 1/2 teaspoons table salt 
3/4 cup bulgur 
2 tablespoons vegetable oil 
2 medium onions , chopped fine (2 cups)
1 rib celery (large), chopped fine (about 1/2 cup)
1 small leek , white and light green parts only, chopped fine (about 1/2 cup)
2 medium cloves garlic , minced or pressed through garlic press (2 teaspoons)
1 pound cremini mushrooms (or white), cleaned and sliced about 1/4 inch thick (about 6 1/2 cups)
1 cup raw unsalted cashew 
1/3 cup mayonnaise 
2 cups panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
  Ground black pepper 
12 burger buns for serving


1. Bring 3 cups water, lentils, and 1 teaspoon salt to boil in medium saucepan over high heat; reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until lentils are just beginning to fall apart, about 25 minutes. Drain in fine-mesh strainer. Line baking sheet with triple layer paper towels and spread drained lentils over. Gently pat lentils dry with additional paper towels; cool lentils to room temperature.

2. While lentils simmer, bring 2 cups water and 1/2 teaspoon salt to boil in small saucepan. Stir bulgur wheat into boiling water and cover immediately; let stand off heat until water is absorbed, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain in fine-mesh strainer; use rubber spatula to press out excess moisture. Transfer bulgur to medium bowl and set aside.

3. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add onions, celery, leek, and garlic; cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables begin to brown, about 10 minutes. Spread vegetable mixture on second baking sheet to cool; set aside. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil to now-empty skillet; heat over high heat until shimmering. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 12 minutes. Spread mushrooms on baking sheet with vegetable mixture; cool to room temperature, about 20 minutes.

4. Process cashews in food processor until finely chopped, about fifteen 1-second pulses (do not wash food processor blade or bowl); stir into bowl with bulgur along with cooled lentils, vegetable-mushroom mixture, and mayonnaise. Transfer half of mixture to now-empty food processor and pulse until coarsely chopped, fifteen to twenty 1-second pulses; mixture should be cohesive but roughly textured. Transfer processed mixture to large bowl; repeat with remaining unprocessed mixture and combine with first batch. Stir in panko, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Line baking sheet with paper towels. Divide mixture into 12 portions, about 1/2 cup each, shaping each into tightly packed patty, 4 inches in diameter and 1/2 inch thick; set patties on baking sheet; paper towels will absorb excess moisture. (Patties can be covered with plastic wrap and refrigerated up to 3 days.)

TO COOK ON THE GRILL: Build medium-hot charcoal fire or preheat gas grill on high. Using tongs, wipe grate with wad of paper towels dipped lightly in vegetable oil. Grill burgers, without moving them, until well browned, about 5 minutes; flip burgers and continue cooking until well browned on second side, about 5 minutes. Serve.

TO COOK ON THE STOVETOP: Heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering; cook burgers, 4 at a time, until well browned, about 4 minutes per side, lowering heat to medium if browning too quickly. Repeat with additional oil and burgers. Serve. (Cooked burgers can be kept warm in 250-degree oven for up to 30 minutes.)

TO FREEZE: With freezing and defrosting, the patties increase in moisture content; it is therefore necessary to add more bread crumbs before freezing. For each burger to be frozen, add 1 teaspoon panko or 1/2 teaspoon plain bread crumbs to the mixture before shaping. Thaw frozen patties overnight in the refrigerator on a triple layer of paper towels covered loosely with plastic wrap. Before cooking, pat the patties dry with paper towels and reshape to make sure they are tightly packed and cohesive.




STEP BY STEP: Secrets to Better Veggie Burgers

1. Spread lentils between layers of paper towels and blot dry.

2. Once softened, drain bulgur in sieve and press with spatula.

3. Sauté mushrooms and vegetables until caramelized and dry.

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Salmon Cakes

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:36
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Pan-Fried Fresh Salmon Cakes
1/2000

A big wedge of lemon is the simplest accompaniment to salmon cakes, but if you decide to go with dipping sauce, make it before preparing the cakes so the sauce flavors have time to meld. If possible, use panko (Japanese bread crumbs).

Makes eight 2 1/2- by 3/4-inch cakes
1 1/4 pounds salmon fillet 
1 slice white sandwich bread , such as Pepperidge Farm, crusts removed and white part chopped very fine (about 5 tablespoons)
2 tablespoons mayonnaise 
1/4 cup grated onion 
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves  
3/4 teaspoon table salt 
1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice from 1 lemon
1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 
2 large eggs , lightly beaten
1/2 cup vegetable oil , plus 1 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil
3/4 cup fine, unflavored dried bread crumbs , preferably panko


1. Locate and remove any pin bones from salmon flesh, (see related Quick Tip). Using sharp knife, cut flesh off skin, then discard skin. Chop salmon flesh into 1/4- to 1/3-inch pieces and mix with chopped bread, mayonnaise, onion, parsley, salt, and lemon juice in medium bowl. Scoop a generous 1/4-cup portion salmon mixture from bowl and use hands to form into a patty measuring roughly 2 1/2-inches in diameter and 3/4-inch thick; place on parchment-lined baking sheet and repeat with remaining salmon mixture until you have 8 patties. Place patties in freezer until surface moisture has evaporated, about 15 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, spread flour in pie plate or shallow baking dish. Beat eggs with 1 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil and 1 1/2 teaspoons water in second pie plate or shallow baking dish, and spread bread crumbs in a third. Dip chilled salmon patties in flour to cover; shake off excess. Transfer to beaten egg and, using slotted spatula, turn to coat; let excess drip off. Transfer to bread crumbs; shake pan to coat patties completely. Return now-breaded patties to baking sheet.

3. Heat remaining 1/2 cup vegetable oil in large, heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking, about 3 minutes; add salmon patties and cook until medium golden brown, about 2 minutes. Flip cakes over and continue cooking until medium golden brown on second side, about 2 minutes longer. Transfer cakes to plate lined with paper towels to absorb excess oil on surface, if desired, about 30 seconds, and then serve immediately, with one of the sauces that follow, if you like.



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Chicken Teriyaki

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:35
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Chicken Teriyaki
1/2005

If you prefer to serve whole bone-in thighs and thereby skip the step of boning the chicken, trim the thighs of excess skin and fat, position the oven rack about 12 inches from the heat source, and increase the broiling time to 20 to 26 minutes, rotating the pan once halfway through the cooking time. This recipe was developed to work in an in-oven broiler, not the drawer-type broiler typical of older gas ovens. Mirin, a sweet Japanese rice wine, is a key component of teriyaki; it can be found in the international section of most major supermarkets and in most Asian markets. If you cannot find it, use 2 tablespoons white wine and an extra teaspoon of sugar. If desired, low-sodium soy sauce can be used in place of regular soy sauce. Serve with steamed rice, preferably short grain.

Serves 4 to 6
8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 5 ounces each), trimmed, boned, and skin slashed (see illustrations below)
  Table salt and ground black pepper 
1/2 cup soy sauce 
1/2 cup sugar 
1/2 teaspoon grated fresh ginger 
1 clove garlic , minced or pressed through garlic press (about 1 teaspoon)
2 tablespoons mirin 
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch 


1. Position oven rack about 8 inches from heat source; heat broiler. Season chicken thighs with salt and pepper; set thighs skin side up on broiler pan (or foil-lined rimmed baking sheet fitted with flat wire rack), tucking exposed meat under skin and lightly flattening thighs to be of relatively even thickness (see illustration 6). Broil until skin is crisp and golden brown and thickest parts of thighs register 175 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 8 to 14 minutes, rotating pan halfway through cooking time for even browning.

2. While chicken cooks, combine soy sauce, sugar, ginger, and garlic in small saucepan; stir together mirin and cornstarch in small bowl until no lumps remain, then stir mirin mixture into saucepan. Bring sauce to boil over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally; reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce is reduced to 3/4 cup and forms syrupy glaze, about 4 minutes. Cover to keep warm.

3. Transfer chicken to cutting board; let rest 2 to 3 minutes. Cut meat crosswise into 1/2-inch- wide strips. Transfer chicken to serving platter; stir teriyaki sauce to recombine, then drizzle to taste over chicken. Serve immediately, passing remaining sauce separately.




STEP BY STEP: Preparing Chicken Thighs

1. After trimming excess skin and fat (leave enough skin to cover meat), cut slit along white line of fat from one joint to other joint to expose bone.

2. Using tip of knife, cut/scrape meat from bone at both joints.

3. Slip knife under bone to separate meat completely from bone.

4. Discard bone. Trim any remaining cartilage from thigh.

5. Cut three diagonal slashes in skin. Do not cut into meat.

6. Tuck meat under skin and lightly flatten thigh to even thickness.

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Coconut Shrimp with Mango Chutney

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:35
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Coconut Shrimp with Mango Chutney
2/2005

Panko can be found in the international food aisle at most supermarkets.

Serves 4 to 6
1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 
1/2 teaspoon paprika 
1/2 teaspoon Ground white pepper 
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 
1/4 teaspoon table salt 
1/4 teaspoon sugar 
2 large eggs 
1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut 
1 cup panko (Japanese-style bread crumbs)
9 ounces smooth mango chutney (1 jar), or any high quality, such as Major Grey's
1 pound extra-large shrimp (21 to 25 count), peeled and deveined
3–4 cups vegetable oil , for frying
1 lime , cut into wedges


1. Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and heat the oven to 200 degrees. Combine the flour, spices, salt, and sugar in a shallow dish or pie plate. Lightly beat the eggs with 1 tablespoon water in another shallow dish. Combine the coconut and panko in a third shallow dish. If the chutney isn't smooth, puree the chutney in a food processor until alomost smooth, ten 1-second pulses. Transfer the pureed chutney to a medium serving bowl and set aside.

2. Working with several shrimp at a time, drop them into the flour mixture and gently shake the dish back and forth to coat. Shake the excess flour from the shrimp. Then, using tongs, dip the shrimp into the eggs, turning to coat well, and allow the excess to drip off. Drop the shrimp into the coconut-panko mixture, and press the coconut lightly to adhere. Shake off any excess coconut and place the shrimp on a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining shrimp.

3. Meanwhile, heat the vegetable oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat until it reaches 350 degrees. (Use an instant-read thermometer that registers high temperatures or clip a candy/deep-fat thermometer onto the side of the pan before turning on the heat.) Gently place half of the shrimp in the oil and fry, stirring frequently to prevent sticking, until golden, about 2 1/2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, spider, or tongs, transfer the shrimp to a rimmed baking sheet lined with several layers of paper towels and repeat with the remaining shrimp. Serve immediately, accompanied by the mango chutney and lime wedges.



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Cook's Tonkatsu Sauce

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:29
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Tonkatsu Sauce
1/2002

Tonkatsu are much like our own pork cutlets but are even easier to make. First, because the meat is meant to have some chew, boneless loin chops can be used, thus eliminating the need to butcher a tenderloin. Neither is there a need to make fresh bread crumbs; use Japanese panko bread crumbs instead. Tonkatsu are served with a simple sauce made from American pantry ingredients.

Makes about 1/2 cup
1/2 teaspoon dry powdered mustard 
1 teaspoon water 
1/2 cup ketchup 
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 
2 teaspoons soy sauce 


1. Mix mustard powder with water until smooth.

2. Mix mustard powder/water combination with remaining ingredients thoroughly in small bowl.


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Cook's Tonkatsu

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:26
Tags:


Japanese-Style Crisp Breaded Pork Cutlets (Tonkatsu)
1/2002

In Japanese restaurants, fried pork cutlets called tonkatsu are popular. Tonkatsu are much like our own pork cutlets but are even easier to make. First, because the meat is meant to have some chew, boneless loin chops can be used, thus eliminating the need to butcher a tenderloin. Neither is there a need to make fresh bread crumbs; use Japanese panko bread crumbs instead. Tonkatsu are served with a simple sauce made from American pantry ingredients.

Serves 3
3 cups panko 
1/2 cup cornstarch 
2 large eggs 
1 tablespoon vegetable oil 
1 cup vegetable oil 
6 boneless, center-cut pork loin chops center-cut, trimmed of silver skin and fat, and pounded to 1/2-1/4-inch thickness
  Table salt and ground black pepper 


1. Transfer panko to pie plate or shallow baking dish.

2. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position, set large heatproof plate on rack, and heat oven to 200 degrees. Spread cornstarch in second pie plate. Beat eggs with 1 tablespoon oil in third pie plate. Position cornstarch, egg, and panko plates in row on work surface.

3. Blot chops dry with paper towels and sprinkle thoroughly with salt and pepper. Working one at a time, dredge chops thoroughly in cornstarch, shaking off excess. Using tongs, dip both sides of chops in egg mixture, allowing excess to drip back into pie plate to ensure very thin coating. Dip both sides of chops in breadcrumbs, pressing crumbs with fingers to form even, cohesive coat. Place breaded chops in single layer on wire rack set over baking sheet and allow coating to dry about 5 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, heat 1/2 cup oil in heavy-bottomed 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking, about 2 1/2 minutes. Lay 3 chops in skillet; fry until deep golden brown and crisp on first side, gently pressing down on cutlets with wide metal spatula to help ensure even browning and checking browning partway through, about 2 1/2 minutes. Using tongs, flip chops, reduce heat to medium, and continue to cook until meat feels firm when pressed gently and second side is deep golden brown and crisp, again checking browning partway through, about 2 1/2 minutes longer. Line warmed plate with double layer of paper towels and set chops on top; return plate to oven.

5. Discard oil in skillet and wipe skillet clean using tongs and large wad paper towels. Repeat step 4 using remaining 1/2 cup oil and now-clean skillet and preheating oil just 2 minutes to cook remaining 3 chops.

6. To serve, slice chops into 3/4-inch-wide strips and drizzle with Tonkatsu Sauce.

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Chicken Katsu

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:18
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I found this recipe at http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Ashleys-Chicken-Katsu-with-Tonkatsu-Sauce/Detail.aspx, but the reviews say the sauce is terrible.  Everyone LOVES the Chicken Katsu part, though, and I can't wait to make this!  I've copied ONLY the ingredients and instructions for the Chicken Katsu here.


INGREDIENTS

  • Chicken
  • 8 cups vegetable oil, for deep-fat frying
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups panko bread crumbs
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 egg, beaten
  • 8 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves - pounded to 1/4 inch thickness
  • 4 green onion, thinly sliced

DIRECTIONS

Heat oil in deep-fryer to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  1. Place flour and panko bread crumbs onto separate plates and season with salt and pepper. Place the beaten egg in a medium bowl. Dip flattened chicken pieces first into flour, then egg, and lastly bread crumbs.
  2. Fry breaded chicken breasts in preheated oil until golden brown and no longer pink in center, about 8 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to absorb excess oil. Slice chicken into thin strips and top with a drizzle of sauce and a sprinkling of sliced green onions. Serve remaining sauce on the side for dipping.

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Tonkatsu Deep Fried Pork Cutlets

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:17
Tags:

Tonkatsu (deep fried pork cutlets)

For 2 cutlets

  • 2 pork chops or cutlets, boned. You can use the chop part, or use the filet part, whichever you perfer
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • flour for dusting the cutlets
  • panko or dried bread crumbs
  • peanut oil for deep frying
  • salt and pepper

Trim the cutlets if necessary to get rid of any excess fat. (Note, some tonkatsu afficionados leave the fat on, but I like to cut it off.) Make small cuts all the way around the cutlet. This prevents it from shrinking and curling up when cooked.

Heat the oil to medium heat, about 160°C.

Lightly season the cutlets with salt and pepper. Dust the cutlets in flour, then dip in the beaten egg, coating the surface thoroughtly. Finally roll in the breadcrumbs.

Deep fry the cutlets in the oil, turning a couple of times, until golden brown. You can tell if it's done by poking it. If it feels firm, it's done. If it yields to pressure, then it's not done yet.

Drain thoroughly. Cut with a sharp knife into slices while still hot. Arrange on a plate with finely shredded cabbage, and condiments to taste: lemon wedge, mustard (not the French kind, but the English kind - plain mustard powder that's been reconstituted with water), or steak sauce.


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Tonkatsu Sauce Recipe

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 11:16
Tags:

tonkatsu sauce
(east-west sauce)

You don't really need to know how to make this. There are a few versions (e.g. "Bulldog" brand) that can be found on the shelves at Asian markets, but it's fun sometimes to construct a sauce from scratch. That way, you can make subtle adjustments to suit your personal tastes or, perhaps, even jazz a ho-hum sauce into some remarkable. I like tonkatsu sauce. I like it a lot. Also known as 'East-West Sauce,' this sauce is used most often with Tonkatsu but can also be used as a steak sauce or BBQ sauce for chicken or fish. A tablespoon or two added to Japanese worcestershire sauce also makes a fine fried noodle (yakisoba) sauce. (See Yakisoba for a simple yakisoba recipe.) It's even good drizzled over a shredded cabbage salad.

Makes about 1/2 cup

1/4 Cup Ketchup
4 tsp Rice wine
4 tsp Soy sauce
4 tsp Worcestershire sauce
4 tsp Sugar
4 tsp Rice wine vinegar
4 tsp Yellow mustard
1/4 tsp Ground allspice
1/8 tsp Ground clove
1/4 tsp Garlic powder

Mix all ingredients together in medium-size glass or plastic bowl, then whisk until thoroughly blended.

Use as a sauce with tonkatsu and katsudon, or as a sauce to accompany grilled chicken, turkey, pork, steaks or fish. You can even drizzle some on a shredded cabbage salad.


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Green Tea Matcha Cookies

Posted on 2007.10.15 at 09:01
Tags:

Just for you, Heather, here's a recipe you've been looking for.   I found it here:
http://www.lovescool.com/archives/2007/05/15/best-bakery-recipe-finalist/

Green Tea Sweets

Ingredients
Yield (2” leaf shape): Approx 25

3/4 cup (2.25 oz) Confectioners sugar
5 oz Unsalted butter, cut into cubes
1 3/4 cup (8.5 oz) All-purpose flour
3 Large egg yolks
1.5 TBS Matcha (powdered green tea)
1 cup Granulated sugar (for coating)

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.
  • Whisk the confectioner’s sugar and green tea together in a bowl.
  • Add the butter and green tea/sugar mixture to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a fork. Mix until smooth and light in color.
  • Add the flour and mix until well combined.
  • Add the egg yolks and mix just until the eggs are fully incorporated and a mass forms.
  • Form the dough into a flattened ball, wrap and chill in the refrigerator until firm (about 30 minutes).
  • Roll the dough out to ½” thickness.
  • Cut the dough with a cookie cutter.
  • Toss each cut cookie in a bowl of granulated sugar to coat.
  • Place the sugar-coated cookie on a parchment lined pan. Bake at 350F for 12-15 minutes, or until slightly golden around the edges.

Baker’s Note: You can purchase Matcha (powdered green tea) from Asian grocery stores or specialty tea shops. In NYC try McNulty’s Tea House, Ito-En or you can order baking grade matcha online. The higher quality matcha you use, the brighter green the cookies will be. Store the cookies in a tin or other container that blocks out sunlight to preserve the color. The green color will fade when exposed to sunlight.

Enjoy!


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Lookie! Pretty!

Posted on 2007.10.05 at 00:10
Current Mood: accomplishedaccomplished
Tags:
Lookie!  Pretty!

This is what I spent my evening doing...pretty, huh?  It's the most even, consistent merino wool I've spun so far.  I'm VERY pleased with this one!


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My first efforts at SPINNING yarn!

Posted on 2007.10.04 at 17:44
Current Mood: busybusy
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My first efforts at SPINNING yarn!

OK, lots of pictures here. I tried spinning lots of different fibers, and here are the results. So far, my favorites are merino pencil roving and corriedale roving.

This was acrylic pencil roving - and I really don't like acrylic - but the colors are spectacular, and they're so much fun to spin!  They'll probably end up being a hat and scarf, but you never know!




My pictures of these yarns don't do them justice.  They're really muted colors, in plum, green, blue, white, etc.


This set of beauties is merino wool.  So soft I cant keep from rubbing it against my cheek!



Corriedale wool.


This last one is one of my favorites!  Corriedale wool plied with silk.

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I got my ravelry invite! Finally!

Posted on 2007.10.04 at 17:41
Current Location: Home
Current Mood: ecstaticecstatic
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I got my ravelry invite! Finally!

Can you see it? Sure you can! It's HUGE! Actually I think my smile is bigger than my face at the moment! I got it! Yippee! Ravelry, here I come! I can't wait to get started getting my information in there!

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/CalifSpinner

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This is SO ME!

Posted on 2007.09.10 at 09:54
Current Mood: amusedamused
What Kind of Yarn am I?





What kind of yarn are you?




You are Merino Wool.You are very easygoing and sweet. People like to keep you close because you are so softhearted. You love to be comfortable and warm from your head to your toes.
Take this quiz!








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